Top 50 Movies to Watch Instead of Trump’s Inauguration

 

Well, many of us WON’T be watching Trump’s inauguration. Some will read, spend time with family, clean out clutter, pray, weep, hit their heads against the wall,  wonder what the hell happened.
And some will be watching something else.
Why not watch a movie that peacefully protests the mocking, the grabbing, the KKK parading, the wall building, cabinet choices, the Islamophobia, the homophobia… Rent, download, look through your own movie library, call friends, have a “Boycott the Bull” party and revisit a favourite flick or check out something that you’ve always meant to see.
What follows is a list of movies I highly recommend that will validate your decision and remind you WHY you AREN’T watching as Trump slithers into the White House.

My Top 50 Recommendations

My Left Footthe-theory-of-everything
Children of a Lesser God
The Miracle Worker
Mask
Soul Surfer
The Theory    of Everything
The Horse Whisperer

 

12 Years a Slave
Crash (2004)
Amistad
The Help
Amazing Grace
precious-with-quote
Malcolm X
Precious
The Colour Purple
North Country
Suffragette
Thelma and Louise
Girl, Interrupted
The Stepford Wives
The Hours
The Passion of Joan Arc

 

Like Water for Chocolate
Real Women Have Curveshow-dare-anyone-tell-me
Frida
Mad Hot Ballroom
Silent Light
The Vanished Elephant

 

 

The Kite Runner
American East
Slum Dog Millionaire
Water
Syriana
The War You Don’t See
Occupation 101: Voices of the Silenced Majority
Rachel: An American Conscience

 

An Inconvenient Truth
Black Hole
the 11th Hour
Under the Dome
Vanishing of the Bees
Unacceptable Levels
If a Tree Falls

 

Boys Don’t Cry
Brokeback Mountain
Milk
The Birdcage
TransAmerica
Moonlight
The Danish Girl

Tell Trump he isn’t worth the time by putting him on “ignore.”

frankly-my-dearshocked-trump

And share this list, please! Tune Trump OUT as he’s sworn in.

My Pledge to Young Readers: Diversity, tolerance and Inclusion

Like so many Canadians, I watched the recent American election with horror.   I felt a sense of shock as you-know-who won state after state.   It hit me on multiple levels.  It’s been five days since the results were made known.  In that time, I had to come to terms with what that meant to me as a writer of children’s books.

Books are powerful tools.   They teach as they entertain.  They become friends and they live-on in memories.   Stories encourage, transport us and nurture character.

ruby-bridges   Today, I went to the library and took out several books for my seven year old daughter to read.  One is called, Ruby Bridges Goes to School by Ruby Bridges.  It is about segregation.  Another book which we borrowed is titled Tolerance by Connie Coldwell Miller.  Now, more than ever, it is essential that we discuss racism with our children. It is a difficult subject, but it is one that cannot be ignored or put off.

As a children’s book writer, I realize I have a responsibility during this highly turbulent time.  Acts of discrimination and sexism are increasing.  Swastika graffiti is on the rise.  Minorities are being threatened, and the threats are very real.

Recently, I read a cautionary article about minority characters.  The piece advised against including characters of different cultures simply to include different cultures.

I am sensitive to cultural appropriation, and I understand that culture should not be used to marginalize or stereotype or denigrate.  But I refuse to segregate my characters, to commit literary apartheid.

 

milo-and-jazz
Milo and Jazz by Lewis B. Montgomery

I live in a multicultural country, and I believe in its diversity.  And the more I think about it, the more I believe it is imperative that I include that diversity in what I write.

So often, I browse through early chapter books and see princesses and fairies and girl protagonists with fair skin, blue eyes and blond hair.  Surely, we are more than this?  What does this say of our diversity, our national commitment to inclusion?  Do best friends need to have the same skin colour, religion, family background?  What are we saying to our readers when characters only play with their own ethnicity?  Aren’t these questions we should be asking ourselves?

So, here is my vow to young readers:

1) The characters in my books will come from a range of cultures.  They will each have their own unique personalities, and I will do my best to respect both traditions and beliefs.

2) Some of the characters in my books will have both a mother and a father. But some will have just a mother or just a father.  And some will have two fathers or two mothers.  Love is love.

3) I will include women firefighters and male nurses. Some dad’s will stay home, and some mothers will be managers.   My characters will enjoy activities based on their interests, not on their genders.

4) Some of my characters will have physical or developmental challenges. Some may be in wheelchairs and some may use service animals.

5) One of my next books deals with bullying and gender roles. I feel strongly that villainizing a bully does not belong in early chapter books.  My stories will allow for change, self-realization, sincere apologies and healed relationships.

As writers, we have a responsibility to our readers. And our stories must embody our commitment to diversity, now more than ever.

Thank you.

DONALD TRUMP & THE SUSPENSION OF DISBELIEF

Fiction writers know that what we pen must — at the very least—sound believable. It’s the “Truth is stranger than fiction” scenario. The reader must willingly go where our story leads them.  If it sounds so out there, so beyond the realm of possibility, then the reader will discount your story, give it a big ole “F”  Now, a good writer can easily achieve that suspension of disbelief.  Which means that what is written may be far off the scale of realism and possibility, but is written in such a way that readers take that tremendous leap of faith and jump down your rabbit hole, or Mary Poppins themselves into a chalk drawing.

 

donald-trumpI’ve been thinking about Donald Trump. I’ve been thinking that if I were to write a novel  based on the current USA political party leaders that I would NOT be able to offer my readers suspension of disbelief.

 

So, we have a man who is an open racist and misogynist who may be voted in as the next president. And this is 2016.  And the last president was — finally — elected because of his platform, not his skin colour.  Think about it.  Think about writing a novel that features a man just a breath away from the most powerful position in the world who says he will PUNISH  ADULT WOMEN for having an abortion, who is cuddling up to a superpower who has outlawed homosexuality, hired hitmen to kill journalists and then there is of course that plane that was shot down in the Ukraine with a Russian missile.

Now, this presidential candidate has been caught in lies, let it slip that he doesn’t pay taxes (actually states that trying to find loopholes proves he’s smart –screw ethics, who needs them) and basically says when a woman says no, she doesn’t really mean it.

Even fiction couldn’t sell this guy as the next president. Readers would roll their eyes, stop halfway through the first page and chuck that paperback right into the closest garbage can.

Still, I can see him in a reworked fairy-tale… as the dragon or … the wolf who cross-dresses in Granny’s bonnet.   He’d make an awesome ‘Joker’ or ‘Lex Luther,’ right?

Naw. Even the Joker wouldn’t t set off a nuclear missile or re-launch the demographics which led to the holocaust.  So, best to leave this crazy villain where he stands.  At the doorway to Hell, refusing to tuck his tail between his legs …